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I plan on getting another Leupold for my Remington, Have one mounted on my 516 Patrol, I just really liked the looks and the reticle of the Trijicon
I just bought the same scope, can't wait to mount it on my rifle as well
Mounting mine on a Sig Sauer 716 Patrol FDE View attachment 11681 View attachment 11673 View attachment 11665
I would recommend going Leupold.

Consider this: The Accupower is a 2nd or third tier offering from Trijicon, contracted out with a Japanese maker. The Mark 4 is a tier 1 product from Leupold, simply of an older design but American made with an epic track record. The Leupold is not a compromise product.

Also, know that Leupold will phase out the old Mark 4 designs this year, so get'em while they're hot.

For the 716 Patrol, I would recommend getting a Mark 4, Illuminated, TMR, with M3 knobs. 3.5-10x range.
 

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I have a mark 4...and I sold another one. There are better scopes for the money. Mark 4's are about 15 years behind in technology and features.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
FWIW I think it's silly that we live in an age where we don't pick these things up and hold them before we shell out the big bucks.

It's not like it's easy... most vendors near most people just don't have high-end glass sitting out on display. In my area I'm lucky to see a Monarch 7. I don't even try to find Mark 4s and Trijicons. That's crazy talk.

My recommendation is that you try. Do your darndest to find the scopes in a shop you can afford to drive to. Hold one, then the other. Fiddle with it, look through it. Crank the adjusters. Bring your rifle with you and see how it looks next to the scope (I know you care). Feel the heft (or lack thereof). Feel the *click-click-click*. Look at the reticle. Look at the field of view. Try to acquire a near target, and a far target. Try to read the license plate of a car parked a block away.

We're talking about $800-$1300 worth of equipment here. It's a big deal. Try to avoid buying sight unseen. That way, you'll never question the decision you made.

This is my plan for my next big buy.
 

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it is unheard of in my area to find a dealer with high end scopes or rifles in stock. I have bought all of my good scopes sight unseen...including the TT. If you can attend a class or competition where the guys will let you see their scopes that is great, but it is not likely to find them sitting on the shelf in a store.

My opinion on how to buy a scope...

ask advice from those that you know have used or owned the scopes you are interested in. Really you can't tell much from just looking through a scope in the store. The true test is how well does the scope work in real life and this is only known after it is brought home and used. So find someone who has used one...and other high end scopes to compare it to and will give you advice.

In real life guys with that kind of experience are few and far between. On these forums there are only a few that truly have that kind of experience...but find them and ask their advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
LOL. I'm reading my own review, thinking about buying again.
 

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Trijicon AccuPower 4-16x50 MOA, PART 1


The Trijicon AccuPower series has been out for some months, yet the internet so far has remained largely oblivious to the new offering. Succumbing to curiosity and a general lack of comprehensive information, I bought the "long-range" model of the series, the 4-16x50, and decided to provide a review to the benefit of the internet. Hello, internet. Wakey wakey.

View attachment 7162


The AccuPower 4-16x50 is not the most obvious choice for a long range shooter, in-fact it's downright unappealing for most. Most aspiring snipers like the idea of dialing in, even if they rarely shoot at ranges which justify this busy-work. This scope will not cater to those sensibilities in the least. Additionally, this is a $900 scope that lacks a FFP reticle, which few companies, including Nightforce (which charges much-much more) can successfully explain to consumers. This AccuPower scope is stamped as "Made in Japan". I will assume this is a syntax problem and that actual assembly of the Japanese fabricated parts happens in the good-ole US-of-A. However if we can ignore these sins, there are a few specific qualities and features that should be pointed out:

-Trijicon Ruggedness (I assume, this is TBD PART 2)
-Excellent optical clarity and light gathering
-Good magnification range for precision at 308 distances
-Matching MOA/MOA Adjustments and reticle
-40 MOA of combined elevation hold-over in the reticle
-20 MOA center illumination speeds up the thin reticle when needed
-Reticle remains equally visible at all powers
-4-factor magnification makes for easy SFP math.
-Multi-intensity illumination with intermediate "off" setting, excellent
-Several low-light/ NV settings included in that
-Finger-adjustable windage and elevation w/ tool-less zero reset

View attachment 7163

Why would you buy one?

One word. Simplicity. As an internet shopper, you may have noticed that it is emotionally VERY hard to buy a Trijicon scope for distance work. What makes it hard is the commitment. For most of Trijicon's optics you have to do some serious soul searching to determine what is most important about the way YOU shoot, and the intended PURPOSE of the scope. These aren't the feel-good do-it-all scopes that many of us start out looking for. We want value. That must mean more features, right? Nope. Not with Trijicon. For 99% of Tricon's offerings you are committing to ONE solution for connecting a shooter with the target. Trijicon will give you a reasonable option of WHICH solution. But you have to pick ONE and commit. Of course, for those of us who refuse to compromise at all there's always TARS.

If you buy the 4-16x50 MOA, you are committing to MOA-ranging and holdovers with a 40 MOA elevation cap. It's going to be 30 MOA for those among us who refuse to hold-under. This will mean a hold-over maximum range between 830 and 970 yards. You won't break a grand unless you are comfortable zeroing the highest point of the reticle at max PBR. It must be said that for field work this is a reasonable expectation, and will deliver you very fast results if you can wrap your head around a 430+ yard zero. Let's put it this way: if you buy this scope for distance work, JBM ucards will be your best friend.

You may be curious why I didn't buy the AccuPoint 5-20x50. That was MY hard decision. In the end, it was more important to have precise ranging capability built-in and reticle-matched adjustments. Had Trijicon offered the 5-20x50 design in the AccuPower lineup with the MOA reticle it would have been a no-brainer, and worth the likely $1200 MFG price.

First Impressions

Why aren't there BETTER photos of this thing? ANYWHERE?
The scope comes in an attractive box, ensconced in the usual block of foam as one would expect from Trijicon; with a manual, product summary, sticker, lens cloth, and battery. Technically, yes indeed the scope has lens caps. Those awful fly-by-night operation clear/amber caps that do little more than contribute irony to the overall packaging. These are just packaging. Chuckle sarcastically and discard them.

The scope itself is very well machined. In most internet photos details of the articulated caps get reduced to archaic blobs. Even my photos don't really to them justice. But the attention to detail is apparent in-person. The power ring fox tail is well integrated into the design. The reostat is low and snag-free with a coin-slot type battery cap. Use a penny. The truly unique aspect of the scope is the ultra-matte finish, which is almost velvety in texture. Despite these fine attributes, step back and the scope is otherwise completely unremarkable. This is not an attention-grabber. And guess what? That's perfect. Aesthetics are completely unimportant to what it is: minimal, stealthy.

From Back to Front

View attachment 7164
The ocular adjustment is the fast-adjustment style... Let me rephrase: It is the hyper-drive adjustment style. It is possibly the fastest adjustment from + to - I have ever seen. The entire range is traversed in a little over one turn. To help you keep track, a white indicator is clearly visible on the ocular for verifying your personal setting. This is both a nice feature and absolutely critical given the speed at which the ocular can be accidentally misadjusted. Operation is firm, smooth and instantaneous.

View attachment 7165
The illumination rheostat provides 11 brightness settings with intermediate "off" positions. Again, operation is firm and the knob is machined aggressively for grip.The tactile rheostat clicks are almost enviable for use in target turrets. Almost. There is no such thing as "0" since "off" is every other option on the dial. The numerical font here and elsewhere on the scope is simple and highly legible. No tacti-cool lettering here.The battery cover is tightly fitted to the knob, with a coin slot for switching out the battery. The battery is gripped very securely at the edges by conductive petal springs and is pressed downward with a hefty coil spring under the cap.

The magnification ring is machined with grooves for grip around the entire circumference and with an integral cat tail. The tail's rotational travel is almost exactly 3 oclock (16x) to exactly 9 oclock (4x) and at exactly 12 oclock, you have (8x). For SFP, that's important to know, especially considering that the power settings are not visible from behind the scope. Operation is very firm, but smooth. It will stay where you put it. Depending on your use, the inability to see the power from behind the scope might be a deal breaker. In my case, if I have time for precision I will go straight to 16x. If I'm dealing with a close mover then I will have slammed it back to 4x. There's really no messing around in-between at this power range, and in SFP that practice is a liability. I would consider the AccuPoint 5-20x50 to be at a disadvantage in this regard. There, I would want to see the power setting from the shooting position. And for that power range it really needs to be FFP.

View attachment 7166
The adjuster covers are machined similarly to the power selector. The covers are low-profile and come tightly fastened. One interesting feature (vestigial, perhaps from R&D) is the circumference groove near the top of each cap which is more typical of lanyard-captured caps. No lanyard is provided. And having wrestle lanyards in the past I can't say I miss having one. The covers, once loosened are quick to remove and spin tight again with a snap of the fingers. The threading is a noticeably coarser and deeper profile than what might be seen on a hunting scope, facilitating confident handling and tightening. No searching for tiny, shallow threads here.

Cont in next post....
Any chance you have the manual for this scope still. Looking to see what power setting will be correct for holdings and also looking for information on setting zero with this scope.
 
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