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I am planing on getting a sn-9 10x42x88, and was wondering what kind of reticles they put on their scopes, i know it is on the web site, but when i try to download it, my computer messes up, if somone could post pictures of them i would appreciate it.Also, what kind of reticles do you favor for long rang shooting.
thanks
Bluka
 

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SN-9 40x reticle

Remember that this reticle needs to not fill the screen when magnified to much higher power.

Therefore the only ones I seen are a cross hair reticle known as a simplex. With this high of front focal plane reticle this type is the only one which can be applied to this scope. However the information I have relates back to the last shot show and could have changed by now.

Note that the 22x SN-9 variable offers some flexibility, and may for most applications under 1400 yards or so offer a better alternative.
 

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I'm not sure if Critter is correct on the focal plane / magnification issue. I have not verified this on the US Optics site and am working purely from memory here. I recall that US Optics will permit you to place the reticle in either the first or second focal plane (one of which increases the size of the reticle with the magnification and one that does not). The only problem with the placement of a reticle in the non-increasing plane is that it renders a ranging reticle like the MOA scale non-functioning except at one magnification (which is my primary complaint wiht most mil-dot scopes).

I use the 3.8-22x58 SN-3, and have the MOA scale reticle. it increases with the magnification (meaning that it stays a constant width in terms of MOA from 3.8 to 22x) At 600 yards, the reticle does cover some of the target. At 1,000 yards it covers more of the target. But at every range, the MOA reticle gives me accurate rangeing for windage and elevation adjustment - that was more important to me than the increasing width of the reticle.

(I was taught to NOT use the center of the cross-hair as the intended point of impact. My training was to pick and use one of the corner quadrants where the hairs come touch. I use the lower right quadrant, so it does not matter how wide the reticle seems to grow, I can always see my intended point of impact and always use my MOA scale for ranging and quick scope adjustment. Does that makes sense?
 

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Jeffvn said:
I'm not sure if Critter is correct on the focal plane / magnification issue. I have not verified this on the US Optics site and am working purely from memory here.

I use the 3.8-22x58 SN-3, and have the MOA scale reticle. it increases with the magnification (meaning that it stays a constant width in terms of MOA from 3.8 to 22x)
If I am wrong on this one I certainly apologize and admit my mistake. Please let us know what you find out.

 

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I think Criter is correct - but I'm not sure

I think Critter is correct and that I may be wrong....... but I'm not sure. :oops: :shock:

Here is what my US optics Engineering Manual says.

All US Optics reticles are placed in the front focal plane. However, US Optics does something to alter the image so that the size of the reticle is held constant, nothwithstandig magnification used when looking through the scope. Since the field of view is reduced with increased magnification, it appears that the reticle size is increasing - even though its held at a constant size as compared with the MOA.

For example if a reticle bar covers / obscures 1/8 inch of a target at 100 yards it will cover 1 inch at 800 yards when viewed at the same magnification (constant size for the MOA involved). When the magnification is increased, the size of the field of view decreases, but the reticle width stays the same (it just covers more of the now-reduced field of view).

Using the new MOA Scale reticle mentioned in my thread as an example, the horzontal axis is .08 MOA thick. so at 100 yards, the horizontal and verticle axes obscure .08 inchs of target, but at 1,000 yards, that same horizontal axis obscures .8 inchs of target.

http://www.snipercentral.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=614

It makes sense to me.......I think......

JeffVN

Critter - I presume you use that monster club (that is an SN-9 isn't it) to beat bears to death if they get inside the the minimum range of your land cannon... :D
 

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Heh, yeah, when it comes to US Optics, I'm not sure Critter has ever been wrong! He seems to be our local expert on USO.

glad to have him on board!

MEL
 
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