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Game cheater for the non-game eater

This is a tip we picked up from a family member and it works great with deer and wild hog (may work with others). I was dumbfounded that it was so simple.

Game-Cheater for the Non-Game Eater:

Crock pot
Crock pot bag (liner)
Crock pot roast seasoning
Your own wild game meat
Potatoes and veggies to your liking

Cook it just like you would a crock pot roast.

Yes, it's that simple and even non-game eaters will be surprised how good it tastes!

You'll be equally impressed at how easy it is to clean up with the crock pot liner.
 

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Smoked wild turkey

I brine the turkey overnight in 1/2 cup kosher salt,2 cups apple juice,1 gallon of h2o. Boil that combo to dilute,let it cool. Add enough h2o to cover turkey in pot and soak overnight. I skin my wild turkeys,so to keep in moisture,I rub it with Weber Kickin Chicken,and wrap it in cheap fatty bacon.I put it in a cheesecloth so I can hang it in my smoker. I smoke it with charcoal and a little applewood,I also put a small water pan in the smoker. Every hour or so I spray it with apple juice to color it nicely.Takes about 6hrs at 225F,cook till breast reaches 155F and then wrap with tinfoil for 30mins to distribute the juices. I know you'll like it as much as my family!
 

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Since the smokers going.

I experimented with a good sized elk roast this Thanksgiving for something to snack on. If its big enough,cut it lengthwise from both sides,so it opens up like a wallet.I added some thin bacon and seasoned with Worcestershire and soy sauce. Wrap it up,and tied with butchers twine.Smoked at 225F for maybe 3 hrs until internal temps hit 165F,wrap it with foil for half an hour. I sliced it thin and made hard roll sandwiches,also very good with fresh horseradish.
 

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This is applicable for most games.

Saute mirepoix (onions, carrots, celery) in a little bacon fat. Put in the bones and roast with tomato paste. Pour water and boil for at least 4 hours while skimming the top every now and then.

Use this stock to slow cook the meat in a crock pot. Put in your favorite herbs and spices.
 

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Two recipes here; first one's Dutch and I picked it up from a girl whose primary attractions were not her cooking ability. It was in one of her cookbooks, not that she'd have ever attempted it. I've tried it, it's top notch. Second is a very British (moreso 1700-1900 English) approach to a roasted venison cut, typically haunch.

Brabant-style Pheasant
- Oil (Olive or Canola, I recommend against "vegetable" since it's generally whatever 'scraps' are left over and it's usually pretty impure. To me it tastes like engine oil smells, but of course mileage may vary based on palate)
- Two Pheasants, preferably young
- 1/2 cup butter
- 7 ounces of bacon
- 8 chicory cores (Belgian endive cores), tough outer leaves removed
- Sugar
- Salt
- Black pepper

This involves a roasting pan and a frying pan.

Heat oven to 350F; grease roasting pan with oil.

Season pheasants with salt and pepper, add a half-teaspoon of butter to each bird's cavity.

Melt butter in frying pan with some oil; this lets you achieve a higher temperature without burning the milk fat solids in the butter.
Brown the birds on all sides on medium heat and remove pan from heat.

Let pheasants cool. Wrap the birds in strips of bacon, if necessary truss them with kitchen twine and it may be necessary to literally tie on the bacon if the strips aren't long enough. If your bacon "doubles over" on itself when you wrap the bird, try to have the double thickness of bacon over the top of the bird.

Roast at 350F for 45 minutes or until internal temperature of 149F is reached.
When the birds are done, let them rest for ten, tented under foil.

Reheat the frying pan and add the endives in a single layer to the fat in the pan. Pour in enough water to come halfway up the endives, dot each with a half-teaspoon of butter and season with salt and pepper.
Bring to a boil, then reduce to simmer, cover, and cook for 20 minutes. Turn and simmer for another 20 - or until tender.

Lift the endives out of the frying pan once done and plate them. Pour their cooking liquid into the roasting pan, then boil over the stove and reduce by one third. Add remaining butter to the reduced sauce and stir over the heat, it will thicken.

Sprinkle the endives with sugar and pan-fry until caramelized on both sides.

Carve the birds and arrange on platter with the endives. You can remove the bacon and crumble it into the sauce if you like.

Traditionally served with a parsnip or celeriac puree, though works better with an aligot, and none of those really differ that much in concept to mashed potatoes for those who like their sides familiar and easy.

Roast Venison Haunch 'in the English mode'
- 5 and 1/2 pound deer haunch
- 8oz bacon cut into thick lardons (The English, being fans of heart disease and enemies of flavour, honestly suggested lard or pure pork fat. Fatty bacon will do fine.)
- Five garlic cloves cut in half
- Ten small rosemary sprigs
- Leaves from two thyme sprigs
- 4 tablespoons olive oil
- 2 cups of ruby port. Failing this, use a dark red, your choice of type.
- 2 tablespoons redcurrant jelly. Failing this, I suggest a strawberry jam.
- Salt
- Black pepper

Preparation: The day before, stab the haunch like it stole your wife. Ten evenly spaced holes are what you want, I suggest using a fair-sized knife with a reasonably thick blade since that makes your life easier for the next step. In each hole you will stuff a half of a garlic clove, a rosemary sprig, and lardons.

Marinate the stabbed-and-stuffed roast in the thyme, two (2) tablespoons of oil and all of the port. Leave for twelve hours, and if possible turn it over around the middle of this time.

Cooking: Preheat oven to 425F, grease a roasting pan with 2 tablespoons of oil, lay the roast in while reserving the marinade and season with salt and pepper. Dry-roast for ten minutes at 425F.

Reduce heat to 350, add marinade, cook for 30-40. Baste frequently. If the bacon wasn't fatty enough and it's starting to look suspiciously like the Dasht-e-Margo in there, dab the roast with a bit of butter.

Remove roast when cooked, strain the juices into a pan and bring these juices to simmer. Whisk in the jelly/jam, reduce by a third.

Recommended to serve with roasted potatoes; french fries are like roasted potatoes and generally faster.
 
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