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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, I'm pretty much completely new to the whole marksmanship thing, but I wanted to start training myself, and I have a few options for my starter rifle. My family owns a few firearms, a pair of .22s, a 30-30, and 2 30-06's to be precise. I'm a relatively unwealthy college student at the moment, so buying a new rifle is not an option for me, and I was examining prices for ammunition. the ammunition of the 30-30s was not nearly as plentiful as the other two (and I am not in a sportsman-heavy area). I would love to start out on the 06, but money is tight-ish, and I'm wondering if there is much merit to the idea of starting closer range and learning basic marksmanship on the .22 (with its ridiculously cheap ammunition) before moving up to a heavier rifle.

feel free to point me in the error of my ways, be nice if it suits your fancy. here to learn and see what I can pick up

thanks!
 

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A 22 is THE BEST for learning and keeping your skills up. Don't even touch a larger caliber until you get good with the .22.
 

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look at it this way. you can use the .22 until you get a larger caliber and since you are on the broke side (along with me as well :lol: ) you would be working with the .22 for a while and the longer you work with it the better you will become with basic marksman ship skills which will equate to alot easier time when you move on up. good luck.
 

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I have money to burn on ammo, a big ol' .308 and a few others, membership to a private range and I am considerably older/more practiced that you sound to be.....

All that considered, I burn over 500 rounds a month through my little .22 Remington Targetmaster! A .22 is the single best tool for you to improve your fundamentals and accuracy and is just what you need for your start.

That is great that you already have the best tool for you start.

Congratulations!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Follow-up question:

should I start with iron sights and then move to scope? that was my gut feeling but just wanted to see what those who are more experienced thought
 

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h6x6n said:
Follow-up question:

should I start with iron sights and then move to scope? that was my gut feeling but just wanted to see what those who are more experienced thought

.22s are great for learning and just shooting for fun. They are cheap to shoot and lots of fun.

Every man should know how to use iron sights. Get good with irons and then get a scope.
 

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This is just my opinion, but I am glad I started with iron sights, I think I learned to be more adaptable and can switch from irons to scoped with no issues.

And get out to the longest ranges you can, At 300 yards or so with a 22, you fire the round, put down the rifle, get a cup of coffee, and then listen for the hit :lol:
 

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Worthwhile? Preferred over everything but a pellet rifle.

-Nate
 

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What kind of .22lr is it?

And like they said, a .22lr is incredible for starting out. Shoot it a lot. And like they said, start with irons and switch to a scope.

And a bit of advice on the scope. I know it's hard when you are tight on money, but get a good one. I started with cheap scopes, and they can be extremely frustrating. So start saving now and get a decent one. (and make sure it either has an adjustable objective or close parallax) You'll have to take my word on this, but you will hate shooting if you have a crappy scope, it will frustrate you to the point of quitting shooting. Get a good one.

And for god's sake, DO NOT start target practicing with that 30-06 until you get **** good with that .22lr. I made the mistake of starting big. My first rifle was a remington 700 in 300 RUM, and a cheap scope to top it off. 2 scopes to be correct, it tore the first one nearly in half. I developed a major flinch from it. I couldn't shoot for crap for a while. Fortunately, the gun that started it also solved it. :lol: If I flinched shooting that cannon, the scope cut me. So, after shooting it for a while, I learned to stop flinching and it stop hitting me. :lol: But at $70 a box for ammo, that was a hard lesson.

Point is, do not start with that 06 or you will regret it. Shoot the .22lr a whole lot. Make sure you enjoy the hobby. It wasn't but a few years back that I started, so it's all fresh in my mind. Start cheap, but not so cheap you won't enjoy it. Once you know you are hooked, start playing with the 30-30, and then the 30-06.

It's an awesome hobby, just make sure you don't start halfway in and make it hard on yourself.

Follow the simple advice, and you'll love it. :D
 

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mr-lama said:
Shoot the .22lr a whole lot.
And just to further emphasize this....by "a whole lot" of .22LR, I interpret that to mean 8-10,000 rounds a year or more. This may not be possible for you--depending mainly on range availability for most people--but if you can shoot that many, you will become better than you may have ever dreamed possible. I know, because that is mainly how I got to where I am...and a lot of how I intend to progress further.

-Nate
 

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I am all about practicing iron sights on my side arm, but it is a whole different world then practicing precision marksman IMHO. I have two ladies from work that want to get hand guns for self defense but have not ever shot guns. They want me to teach them to shoot and some of my favorite pistols have red dot sights. I probably will not start them on red dot since they want to hit a human target 12' away, not a 2" target 25y away so they probably won't want a red dot.

I have the feeling you are comfortable with guns and want to enter the chase for precision...so scope it. Without knowing your rifle, your budget, or if you have any scopes laying around this opinion will vary. I would start with an ok scope and practice your clicks vrs distance. Play with ballistics calculators and run that .22 from 50y to 300y. Keep notes about distance, drops, windage, enviroment, ammo and groups. Practice breathing and squeezing and holding exactly the same each time. Make sure your cheek to stock is set good for your scope ht. (You may need to get or make a cheek pad). After a while, if you can handle the price, treat yourself to some .22 match ammo. The cool thing about the .22 practice is that it has about the same drop and windage of a .308 at twice the distance. I am not sure how that compares with a 30-06 since I have never owned one, probably close. My biggest rifle is a .308 but I would love to get a 338 Lapua someday.

It is all good advice here and above all... Have fun!
 

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I totally agree with the others. A decent 22 with say a Burris 10x 3200 scope and you could shoot out to 300 yards. Be a good way to learn to read wind, learn to make elevation changes at various distances with a chart from JBM ballistics.

They are far more accurate than most believe and a very good trainer.

Check out this video of a basic 22 with an adjustable mount on it and the groups he's shooting. No the mount is not cheap but you also don't need a high dollar scope to sit on top of it and it's able to be changed to another gun.

http://vgmount.com/variable-gantry-mount/

Topstrap
 

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yes.

.22lr training is essential for some. i'm not recoil sesnative so i shoot heavy and light equally poor but the lil sub-caliber makes it fun for plinking and training.

hold work is the key, is it eaxclty the same? no, but it all helps. scope your 22 if you wish to use it as a trainer as that's what your boomer will have why? it's easier to dope hold over and windage and practice same getting used to using glass. i can bong 200y gongs easy standing w/ a duplex reticle on my ultra cheap 22 even in reasonable wind. if you can afford a scope with mil dots get it as there are plenty of cheap ones out there that will work with a 22 or better yet get the scope you want to use on your hi-power and slap it on your 22 then downgrade to another one for your 22 when your hi-power arrives.

also- DO NOT go into hi-power thinking it's gonna create a flinch or do bodily harm because all that stuff is in other's heads. be confident and think about what your are doing and "think" the bullet to the POI from your PAO. sight pic on center w/o prallax, hold, trigger control, clean break, watch it go and poke a hole. this is not a physical game it is 99.9% menta and basics of marksmanship are the same regardless of firearm be it a 177 or a 50 bmg.
 

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mr-lama said:
:lol: Is that a muzzle brake on that cz452? :lol:
Yes it is, you have a problem with that? :wink:



Actually I don't like bare screw threads and the rifle didn't come with the end cap. Sometimes it wears a moderator so I don't have to bother with ear protection.

The trigger weight matches my PSS, but I always try and shoot the
CZ on much higher magnification to improve my concentration.
 

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I'll have to invest in one of those. Mine kicks too much as well. :lol: :p

Mine is the long barreled ultra lux version, so I don't have threads. I see what you mean though, if I had bare threads I would want something to cover it.

Good looking cz. :D
 
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